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Different types of plugs



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 9th 03, 01:47 PM
Matt Larkin
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Default Different types of plugs

OK, I've tried to tease this info out before without looking really
stupid etc etc, but I have to face the music now.

I've accepted that low loss cable is the way to go. But what are
these different types of plugs that I see all over the place?

F-plugs? Eh? What's one of those then? Why is it better than the
normal co-ax plugs that all TVs have? Why would I want one?

Ta muchly!

Matt
  #2  
Old September 9th 03, 07:11 PM
David
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"Matt Larkin" wrote in message

F-plugs? Eh? What's one of those then? Why is it better than the
normal co-ax plugs that all TVs have? Why would I want one?


'F' plugs/sockets are found on satellite boxes.
They are better because no soldering of the center wire is needed.
For best performance normal Tv plugs should be soldered, but I have never
come across a proffesional soldering them on.
--
Regards,
David

Please reply to News Group.


  #3  
Old September 10th 03, 12:54 AM
R. Mark Clayton
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"Matt Larkin" wrote in message
m...
OK, I've tried to tease this info out before without looking really
stupid etc etc, but I have to face the music now.

I've accepted that low loss cable is the way to go. But what are
these different types of plugs that I see all over the place?

F-plugs? Eh? What's one of those then?


Screw on plug.

Large central conductor (1mmsq+) forms the [male] central connector, and the
plug itself screwa back onto the cable to trap the shield, and the plug
itself screws onto the [female] socket.


Why is it better than the
normal co-ax plugs that all TVs have?


Yes

Why would I want one?


Less insertion loss, better connection.

Ta muchly!

Matt



  #4  
Old September 10th 03, 12:35 PM
Mike Cawood
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"David" wrote in message
...

"Matt Larkin" wrote in message

F-plugs? Eh? What's one of those then? Why is it better than the
normal co-ax plugs that all TVs have? Why would I want one?


'F' plugs/sockets are found on satellite boxes.
They are better because no soldering of the center wire is needed.
For best performance normal Tv plugs should be soldered, but I have never
come across a proffesional soldering them on.
--
Regards,
David

Please reply to News Group.


Amazingly my old Technics FM tuner which is 20 years old has an F socket on it
for the aerial, but they did give two F plugs in the box, as in those days F
plugs couldn't be found anywhere, now they can be bought from B & Q.
Mike.



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  #5  
Old September 11th 03, 12:09 AM
Ian
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Default


"Alan Pemberton" wrote in
message Belling Lee plugs were introduced for domestic use at vhf
(300MHz),
initially, and in the sixty odd years that have passed no one has ever
learned how to wire them up properly.


I've always attempted to solder them, and almost always ended up with an
off-centre centre conductor where the plastic bit that holds said
conductor started melting. I've seen more places stocking Belling-Lees
with a little grub screw for grabbing the centre conductor, which I reckon
is a better design.

I'd have thought it was about time to come up with a better design of
connector.


  #7  
Old September 11th 03, 08:55 PM
Mark Carver
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Wrightsaerials wrote:
I have used those with screw and prefer them.


Yeah, they're fine unless you get the dodgy ones.


I remove the screw, and solder. 'orrible plugs :-( (IMHO)


  #8  
Old September 11th 03, 09:41 PM
Paul Ratcliffe
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Default

On Thu, 11 Sep 2003 19:55:48 +0100, Mark Carver
wrote:

Wrightsaerials wrote:
I have used those with screw and prefer them.


Yeah, they're fine unless you get the dodgy ones.


I remove the screw, and solder. 'orrible plugs :-( (IMHO)


I agree. When I tried one, I ended up pulling the screw through the
plastic by attempting to tighten it up to achieve a decent connection.
There is very little surface area in contact between the centre pin via
the screw and the cable inner, and it is quite likely to oxidise and make
a rather nice diode in a not very large amount of time.
 




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